One in three cases of dementia could be potentially prevented by targeting nine risk factors, including continuing education in early life, reducing hearing loss in mid-life, and stopping or reducing smoking. Such prevention requires public health interventions, as well as individual action. Acting now will vastly improve life for people with dementia and their families, and in doing so, will transform the future of society.

KEY MESSAGES

• Dementia is the greatest global challenge for health and social care in the 21st century

• The number of people with dementia is increasing globally

• Prevention is possible and rates of dementia can be greatly decreased

• 9 lifestyle risk factors account for 35% of the risk of getting dementia

• While genes affect Alzheimer’s disease they are relatively less important in older people. The only important gene APOE4 accounts for 7% of risk

• Ambitious action is required at both a policy and

societal level to implement preventative strategies

NINE PREVENTABLE RISK FACTORS

• stopping education at the age of 12-15 years old

• high blood pressure

• obesity

• hearing loss in mid-life (45-65 years old)

• smoking

• depression

• physical inactivity

• social isolation

• diabetes in later life (over 65 years old)

You can download the report here

Preventing Dementia – 9 key risk factors[1]