Smoking and health check advisors available at the practice today

Come along to our free health clinic today at Firstcare Practice, Blenheim Centre, Hounslow. Everyone is welcome. We are open until 3pm on the 12th July.

If you would like help to stop smoking, we have a team of smoking cessation advisors at our practice today.
They will be able to measure the amount of carbon dioxide in your breath,

Carbon Monoxide In smoking

They will also be able to give you your lung age, so you can see how old your lungs are. Smokers then to have ‘older’ lungs and so can see where your lungs are on this graph.Lung Age Pic

We can also measure your height and weight and calculate your Body Mass Index, so as you can see where you are on the graph below. If you need help with loosing weight, we can give you advice on access to free services available locally.

BMI Pic

You can also download these leaflets which have lots of useful information.

Shisha is thought to be less harmful than smoking. This is not the case. The leaflet outlines some useful facts and dispels some myths. Smoking Shisha

Smoking at home can cause cot deaths and chest infections. Read more in this leaflet. Smoking at Home

Here is a leaflet about the harms of smoking in pregnancy. We can help you stop if you are pregnant or planning to get pregnant. Smoking – Pregnancy

Transforming our health care system – Kings Fund Report

Here is a document by the Kings Fund which outlines the 10 things that commissioners can do help transform healthcare.

Kings Fund 10 Priorities

The organisations commissioning health services in England changed radically in April 2013. Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are now responsible for the majority of the NHS budget, controlling around £69 billion in 2015/16. Public health budgets of £2.8 billion have transferred to local authorities (although this figure does not take into account the in-year budget cuts to the public health grant of £200 million announced in June 2015, or the funding that will flow to local authorities due to the transfer of significant NHS responsibilities from October 2015). NHS England is responsible for commissioning primary care (£12 billion) and specialised services (£15 billion), largely through its 4 regional teams and the sub-regions that sit beneath them. As of April 2015, in most parts of the country NHS England shares these responsibilities with CCGs through co-commissioning arrangements, although the extent of delegation varies between CCGs. Health and wellbeing boards, convened by local authorities, are intended to play a key role in coordinating the activities of these commissioners, although their effectiveness is dong so seems variable (Humphries and Galea 2013). Commissioning support units provide a range of services to CCGs and NHS England to help them perform effectively.

Kings Fund - 10

Local leadership, new approaches. How communities are delivering improved health.

This document outlines examples of how health and social care are collaborating.

The full document can be downloaded here.Local Leadership, new approaches

The job of improving the population’s wellbeing and preventing premature mortality starts locally. It starts in people’s neighbourhoods and communities. It is done by local leaders working together, across health and local government, delivering a better deal for their residents. Too often we equate better health with more healthcare: with hospitals, clinicians and health services. But if our ambition is for people to live as well as possible for as long as possible, it will be neither effective nor feasible to ramp up our spending on healthcare. We need to find new ways of working that reflect the fact that ill-health is rarely a single, isolated problem but is often tied up with where and how we live, with our jobs, our families, our incomes. People’s lives aren’t compartmentalised. A crisis in someone’s life – perhaps spiralling debt or the shock of unemployment – is likely to spill over into other areas. It may have knock-on effects on housing, on families, and on a person’s mental and physical health. A visit to the GP can help with the latter, but it cannot, by itself, address the wider set of problems. When people are dealing with the messy reality of multiple challenges, they need support from local services that are joined-up, timely and convenient. Local councillors and local health professionals are used to working together for the health of their communities. But we have to make it even easier for them to join forces, especially in tackling longterm diseases – a burden that we know falls heaviest on those who are most deprived and most vulnerable. We have an opportunity, with the changes to our health and public health landscape, to foster collaboration across sectors. It is an opportunity we cannot afford to pass up. We will learn faster and more effectively if we share the experiences of those who have created joint programmes, and can see the real difference this is making to the wellbeing of local residents. This report contributes to this collective understanding and I am delighted to endorse it and the case studies it highlights. They offer valuable insights to all of us concerned with maximising the impact we hope to have on improving population health and reducing inequalities.

local Leadership, new approaches

Dr Davison Completes Ealing Half Marathon For Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital

Lizzie Marathon We would all like to congratulate Dr Davison in completing the Ealing Half Marathon. She has trained hard to complete over 13 miles in 2 hours 20minutes on an unseasonally hot and humid day.

She ran ran to raise money for Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital.

GOSH Logo

Please click on this link to donate to Great Ormond Street Hospital. Give generously!

Bursts of vigorous exercise could improve health of the elderly

Short six-second bursts of vigorous exercise have the potential to transform the health of elderly people, say researchers in Scotland.

A pilot study involving 12 pensioners showed going all-out in very short bursts, reduced blood pressure and improved general fitness over time.

The team at Abertay University believe it could help avert the “astronomical” costs of ill health in elderly people.

Experts said the study emphasised the benefits of exercise at any age.

High Intensity Training (HIT) has attracted a lot of attention for promising some of the same benefits as conventional exercise but in a much shorter time.

Instead of a comfortable half-hour jog or a few miles on the bike, HIT involves pushing yourself to your limits for a short period of time.

The team in Scotland say they were conducting the first trials in older people.

Get a sweat on

A group of pensioners came into the lab twice a week for six weeks and went hell for leather on an exercise bike for six seconds.

They would allow their heart rate to recover and then go for it again, eventually building up to one minute of exercise by the end of the trial.

“They were not exceptionally fast, but for someone of that age they were,” researcher Dr John Babraj said.

The results, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, showed participants had reduced their blood pressure by 9%, increased their ability to get oxygen to their muscles and found day-to-day activities like getting out of a chair or walking the dog easier.

Dr Babraj told the BBC the benefits could be huge: “We’ve got an ageing population and if we don’t encourage them to be active, the economic burden of that is going to be astronomical.

“A lot of diseases are associated with sedentary behaviour – like cardiovascular disease and diabetes – but if we can keep people active and functioning then we can reduce the risk.

“Also on the social side, they are less likely to be socially active and will interact with people more.”

More than 10 million people in the UK are over 65 and that figure is set to rise.

Dr Babraj says older people struggle to exercise as many are full-time carers, but argues High Intensity Training would be easier to fit in.

He said people could try it at home, but should see their doctor first to ensure there were no underlying health issues.

“Then the easiest way to do it yourself is to run up a hill, the steeper the hill, the harder it’s going to be, give it everything you’ve got for six seconds.”

Safe?

There is an argument that short and strenuous exercise may be safer than conventional exercise.

A higher heart rate and blood pressure caused by exercise can be a trigger for heart attacks and stroke.

Dr Babraj said running for a long time “puts a greater strain on the heart overall” even if it is worked harder in the short-term in High Intensity Training.

Larger trials are now planned.

Dr Adam Gordon, a consultant and honorary secretary of the British Geriatrics Society, told the BBC: “This is a brilliant, fantastic piece of work challenging assumptions about what the right type of exercise is in old age, but I’d encourage them to investigate the benefits in even older and even more frail people.

“The broad message is that you’re never too old, too frail, too ill to benefit from exercise, as long as it’s carefully chosen.

“We know even into your 80s and 90s there’s a benefit from developing a very slight sweat by exercising on multiple occasions per week.”

BBC News